Setting Up Microsoft BackOffice 2.0 (Part 3)

snaserver2-iconThroughout the 1970s and 80s, computer terminals such as the IBM 3270 crept up in office environments allowing staff to easily retrieve data from the company’s mainframe. Mainframes tend to come with a hefty price tag and due to significant investment and mission-critical functions, are subject to much less frequent changes. Whilst the computer terminals gradually were replaced with PCs, the mainframes often remained. The protocol for communications lived on (e.g. as TN3270E) allowing emulation of the original computer terminals themselves.

In Part 3 I’ll be checking out Microsoft SNA Server included with BackOffice 2.0, following from Exchange Server and Internet Information Server some time ago. SNA refers to IBM’s proprietary Systems Network Architecture dating back to 1974. SNA Server was superseded by Microsoft with Host Integration Server in the early 2000s.

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Inspired By Atari: Microsoft Arcade

msarcade-introIn 1993 Microsoft released Arcade for Windows 3.1, as part of their Microsoft Home product line. Inspired by Atari, it was a small collection of games that had been played in the heyday of coin-operated arcade machines over a decade prior. The following year, it also was made available on the Macintosh. Dima Pavlovsky had been the sole developer.

Fitting onto a single floppy disk, Arcade was typically sold in its own retail package. However on occasion the disk was tossed in with some models of Microsoft Mouse, as had been the case with my copy.

Here’s a rundown of the included titles – Asteroids, Battlezone, Centipede, Missile Command, and Tempest which actually contains a little secret.

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eBay Purchase #25 – Microsoft Encarta 96 World Atlas

encarta96worldatlas-introeBay Purchase Price: $5 AUD

Country of Origin: Australia

Condition: Excellent

This was the first in the Encarta World Atlas series. As the name implies this was very much an expansion to the Encarta encyclopedia product line with an emphasis on geography. The maps were much more detailed than what was provided in Encarta, though still no substitute for planning your next interstate road trip. Understanding how the world lives, its statistics, and cultures were also focal points utilising Funk & Wagnalls New Encyclopedia as the data source.

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Windows Home Server

winhomeserver-2In 2007, Microsoft announced and later released Windows Home Server as a way to improve data management around the home. Whilst the 1990s was a time when households may have purchased their first computer, the following decade saw an increase in multiple computers potentially leading to having your data all over the place, such as on USB memory sticks.

By 2010, I decided to have a home server. It was driven by storing internet downloads mostly, and so I built a rather modest Intel i3-based (1st-gen Westmere) PC for this task. My logic was that it would be a more useful and neater solution than purchasing several external USB hard disks over time. Among the parts to piece this PC together, was a copy of Windows Home Server purchased for under $100 AUD.

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eBay Purchase #18 – Microsoft Word for Windows 1.1a

mswinword11-7eBay Purchase Price: Unknown

Country of Origin: Australia & United States

Condition: Good & Brand New (2 x copies, Academic & Retail)

Word processing software has been with us since the earliest days of the PC. Electric Pencil and WordStar were such pioneers before Microsoft Word came about. Microsoft jumped in with Word 1.0 for MS-DOS in 1983, followed by the Macintosh in 1985. Windows and OS/2 releases didn’t materialise until 1989. The original Windows version was designed for Windows 2.x. As Windows 3.0 hit the store shelves in 1990, Word 1.1 soon followed as a maintenance release.

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eBay Purchase #14 – Microsoft Office 4.2.1 for Macintosh

office421mac-1eBay Purchase Price: $48 AUD

Country of Origin: Australia

Condition: Very Good

Microsoft Office for the Macintosh always felt kind of second-rate compared to its Windows counterpart. Microsoft Access never made it, hence no Professional edition available. The exception being with Office 2004 for the inclusion of Virtual PC. The e-mail client changed relatively frequently, whilst Windows users have been using Outlook since Office 97. Within the ‘Office family’ is Publisher, Visio and Project, where the former two didn’t come across to Mac, while the latter was short-lived in the early 1990s.

Interestingly Office’s roots stem from the Macintosh. During the late 1980s Microsoft did well selling individual copies of Word and Excel on the platform, comparative to their PC-based releases. Then in 1989 Microsoft Office 1.0 (originally known as The Microsoft Office) was first distributed, comprising of Word 4.0, Excel 2.2, PowerPoint 2.01, and Mail 1.37 that would run on Apple’s System 6. Five years later would see this version, 4.2, that would generate plenty of resentment amongst Mac users.

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Setting Up Microsoft BackOffice 2.0 (Part 1)

boffice2setup-1As shown in an earlier post, eBay Purchase #9 – Microsoft BackOffice Server 2.0, is a suite of server based products to run with Windows NT. This is a rather high-level overview of setting it up, with installing Windows NT 3.51 Server and using Exchange Server 4.0 to be looked at first.

Here I’m using Oracle VirtualBox 5.1.26 on Windows 10. Initially the process is rather straight forward with installing Windows NT, though the BackOffice applications need more tinkering.

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